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SNC - Lavalin; charges to settlement, have lessons been learned?

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The significance of corporate criminality and leverage is illustrated through the business activities of a Canadian multi-national company. Economic and political impropriety are often welded together to reap dividends, however is it not time to redress the balance in favour of the collective good?


Sharon Hartles was awarded a Master of Arts in Crime and Justice (with distinction) from the Open University in December 2019. She has an interest in crimes of the powerful, including state and state-corporate crime.In an explicit attempt to move beyond criminology, she draws upon a zemiological approach to evidence the social, political and economic context in which crime is produced and interwoven into society via socio-economic inequalities. Liam miles is a Criminology student at Birmingham City University and has a passion for writing on a range of topics including structural inequalities, systematic violence, conflict in the Middle East, Corporate and White Collar crime, and various th…

The Gates of Janus- Analysis of serial murder or a platform to rationalise serial murder?

When I first discovered that notorious serial killer Ian Brady (the Moors Murderer) had written a book from his prison cell offering an insight into the phenomenon of serial killing and its analysis, I thought this can offer a fresh insight into the mind, motive and methodology of a serial killer, through the lens of a serial killer himself. The book within itself holds so much room for critical analysis and interpretation, it is incredibly challenging to pinpoint one particular finding. This blog aims to explore in smaller parts, numerous findings throughout the book- “Gates of Janus”. The book is broken into three significant chapters. The first chapter explores the contextualisation and social construction of serial murder with ties to morality, hedonistic nihilism and the social constriction of murder, and the ways in which the phenomenon of murder has been commodified and romanticised, this is explored through the lens of the media, and produces a cultural criminological narrativ…

Ethics of War- Changing space of the battlefield- Anonymous Killings and moral agency.

Christopher Coker is Professor of International relations at the London School of Economics. In 2008 he published his book- ‘ethics and war in the twenty first century’. This book provides a very original and important narrative towards asking questions such as- why do states go to war? Who are the threats against states? And how in the liberalisation of society, states collectively justify their actions, and provide moral agency?

The biggest point which I have discovered through reading ethics and war in the twenty first century, is the ways in which technological advancements have perpetuated anonymous killings, on the battle field, which within its own structures has changed and to attempt to explore the statement that since the rise of industrialisation and technology, the battlespace has changed, and thus decreased moral agency and increased anonymous killings. This blog aims to explore the factors which have made this statement become true, and to explore the historical, social a…

The Road to 9/11 - A critical analysis

On the 11th September 2001, two American airliners plummeted into the world trade centre towers, causing the towers to fall and over 3,000 lives to be lost. The series of events was described by Peter Dale Scott, author of ‘the road to 9/11, as being the worst case of homicide in all of America’s history. This statement cannot be argued against, there were over 3000 lives lost on the day of 9/11, which devastated families, communities and the world. However, there are many questions which can be raised as to the perpetrators of this act of terror, and what fuelled the attacks of 9/11 to take place in the first instance? Since the advent of 9/11, the world as we know it had drastically changed. The theory and practise of security both on a national and local level has arguably become tighter, we are now living in a society which favours suspicion, surveillance and monitoring of those who we believe pose a threat to our society and our way of life. These are usually presumptuous and soc…

The assassination of Qasem Soleimani- A Critical analysis.

The assassination of Qasem Soleimani- A critical analysis.
On January 3rd 2020, at around 1am local time to the region of Baghdad Iraq, Top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani was killed by a drone airstrike orchestrated by the US, but more namely Donald Trump. It can be argued that this offensive military decision has led to heightened insecurity and rising tensions between the USA and Iran. The USA who according to the CNBC, (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/12/21/trump-signs-738-billion-defense-bill.html) stated that Trump had committed $738 billion dollars to defence spending for fiscal year 2020. Meanwhile Iran is expanding its nuclear weapons programme and is growing stronger in the Middle East.
This blog aims to uncover the events from a historical and political perspective which led to the assassination and to explore why in my opinion, our Prime Minster Boris Johnson has been so slow to respond and what this could mean for the rest of us on the world stage, who can only sit nervously and …

A reflective review of conducting Criminological research.

‘Criminological research for beginners—A student’s guide’ is written by Laura Caulfield and Jane Hill who are both experts in criminological research and have conducted research themselves on a range of interests including criminal psychology, restorative justice and community approaches to crime and deviance. This bookis in my opinion, an essential read for those such as myself who are new to the field of criminology and find use in reading about the learned experiences and empirical conclusions made from those who have conducted academic research as well as those who may wish to re cap on key skills and philosophical theories surrounding the methodologies and routines within criminological research. It can be argued that throughout reading the book, we are provided with a space to critically reflect upon our own epistemologies, ontologies, methods and attitudes to criminological research and how we can apply them to a real life, day to day framework when researching society, individ…